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Romance Is a Billion-Dollar Literary Industry. So Why Is It Still So Overlooked?

Samantha Leach writes in Glamour that romance novels have evolved from the steamy bodice-rippers of the early 1970s to mid 1980s into works that deal meaningfully with “whatever is happening to women or marginalized people.”

ON FAILING THE GOODREADS CHALLENGE

P.N. Hinton discusses 2017, the year she failed miserably in meeting her Goodreads Challenge number of books. She concludes, “When you make reading a task that you have to do, then it stops being fun. And when it stops being fun, you don’t do it at all anymore.”

 Out of Bethlehem: The radicalization of Joan Didion.

Louis Menand writes in The New Yorker:

Didion interprets the political text of American life according to a set of beliefs about disparities of wealth and class. She arrived at those assumptions worthily: by analyzing her own education and experience. And that’s what she sees when she reads the newspaper or follows a campaign. She is never less than amazed by the willingness of everyone in the press to pretend, in the name of keeping the show going, that American life is really not about money and power.

How William Gibson Keeps His Science Fiction Real

In apparent support of the assertion that science fiction is not about the future but the present, Joshua Rothman profiles William Gibson, “the writer who, for four decades, has imagined the near future more convincingly than anyone else.”

The unreliable narrator is the biggest book trend of the decade

From Leah Greenblatt for Entertainment Weekly. Here are some of the books she references: Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn, The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins, The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn, The Wife Between Us by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen, The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides, Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. 

These books—and their narrators—Greenblatt writes, “open a Pandora’s box too long unexplored — a well of real and sometimes deeply ugly feelings that are no less universal for coming in the inconvenient or uncomfortable form of xx chromosomes.”

THE ELEMENTS OF THE HAUNTED HOUSE: A PRIMER

Mystery novelist Emily Littlejohn describes the basic elements of a haunted-house thriller and offers a list of enticing examples.

© 2019 by Mary Daniels Brown

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Audiobooks Last Week's Links Life Stories in Literature Literary History Older Adults in Literature Reading

Literary Links

‘Your throat hurts. Your brain hurts’: the secret life of the audiobook star

If you think narrating audiobooks is a dream job because all you have to do is sit there and read, you’d be wrong. Way wrong. Read all about the complex matters of matching specific books with appropriate readers, of preparing, and of carefully avoiding extraneous noise in the recording studio. At the end of the article is an added bonus of a short history of talking books.

The Joys of Reading with a Second Grader

The End of the Day (1900) by William Sargeant Kendall
The End of the Day (1900) by William Sargeant Kendall

Writer Alison B. Hart rediscovers the joy of reading for pleasure—“ that swoosh of momentum that carries you past the letters on the page, straight into the heart of a story”—by reading Anne of Green Gables aloud to her 8-year-old daughter.

Giving life experience its due

Older adults, particularly older women, often feel invisible, ignored and completely misunderstood by the younger world moving quickly around them. This article by Peter McDermott showcases several Irish authors whose recent novels feature older adult characters. There’s much insight here. For example, McDermott asked about younger authors portraying older characters:

Asked about possible pitfalls in depicting older characters, [Caoilinn] Hughes [the 34-year-old author of Orchid & the Wasp (2018)] said they would be exactly the same as a “writer can fall into when writing any character: undermining their humanity through lazy writing by privileging assumption over observation.”

Joan Didion’s Early Novels of American Womanhood

This article caught my eye because, although I’ve read quite a lot of Didion’s nonfiction, I haven’t read any of her fiction. 

What no Didion heroine can entirely reconcile herself to is the split between what she wants and what a woman is supposed to do: marry, have children, and keep her marriage together, despite the inevitable philandering, despite her other hopes and dreams. Didion’s women have an image in mind of what life should look like—they’ve seen it in the fashion magazines—and they expect reality to follow suit. But it almost never does. In Didion’s fiction, the standard narratives of women’s lives are mangled, altered, and rewritten all the time.

Women’s writing began much earlier than supposed, finds academic

Scholarship has generally dated the first writing by English women to about the 12th century. But here Alison Flood discusses a new book, Women, Writing and Religion in England and Beyond 650-1100, by Diane Watt that places the emergence of women’s writing much earlier, in the 8th century. “Watt, a professor at the University of Surrey, lays out in the book how some anonymous texts from the period were probably created by women, and contends that men rewrote works originally produced by women.”

© 2019 by Mary Daniels Brown