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Monday Miscellany

Zocalo Public Square

Zocalo Public Square is a not-for-profit daily ideas exchange that blends live events and humanities journalism. The entire initiative is a project of the Center for Social Cohesion at Arizona State University and the New America Foundation, and its goal is to “explore connection, place, big ideas, and what it means to be a citizen, be it locally, regionally, nationally, or globally.” Visitors should look at the Ideas area to read meditations on subjects like “Do I have Any Business Being a Doctor?” and “Why We Keep Coming Back to Gatsby.” The Books area is a real pip, featuring omnibus reviews (The Six-Point Inspection) and “Squaring Off,” in which authors answer five questions about the essence of their books. Visitors shouldn’t miss the Viewings area, which includes beautiful photographic essays on the Salton Sea, polling places, and the places where Americans gather.

From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2013. https://www.scout.wisc.edu/

The Chicagoan

In the wake of The New Yorker’s creation, a group of Chicagoans decided to create a like-minded publication for the Windy City. With that in mind, The Chicagoan was born in 1926. This jaunty publication, which lasted until 1935, aimed “to portray the city as a cultural hub and counter its image as a place of violence and vice.” This remarkable website created by the University of Chicago Library brings together the near-complete run contained within the library’s collection for general consideration. Visitors can start by browsing through some of the historic covers on the site, and then move on to perform a full text search of every issue. New users may wish to start by looking at the April 9, 1927 issue, which contains a number of humorous illustrations and a profile of the editor of Poetry, Henry Blake Fuller.

From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2013. https://www.scout.wisc.edu/

The Boy in the Snow7 Compulsively Readable Mysteries (for the Crazy-Smart Reader)

In these intelligent, totally compelling new reads, savvy women detectives (and one exceptional man) not only save the day but also save themselves.