Literary Links

Here are some of the articles about the world of literature that caught my eye recently.

The New York Review of Books  “Truth, Beauty, and Oliver Sacks”

Simon Callow reviews Everything in Its Place: First Loves and Last Tales by Oliver Sacks, the second posthumous collection of Sacks’s essays, most of which were published in The New York Review.

the editors have fashioned the book in such a way that we are left with an image of the author that is extraordinarily touching—not lacking in his habitual energy and driven curiosity, but somehow vulnerable, even fragile.

brainpickings   “The Healing Power of Gardens: Oliver Sacks on the Psychological and Physiological Consolations of Nature”

Maria Popova discuses Oliver Sacks’s book Everything in Its Place: First Loves and Last Tales.

Esquire   Anthony Bourdain Remembered Is a Stunning Tribute to the Late Chef”

A look at the book, put together by CNN, that “includes photos and messages from Barack Obama, Eric Ripert, Jill Filipovic, Ken Burns, Questlove, José Andrés and others who worked with Bourdain.”

The Guardian   “The Heartland review – fascinating study of schizophrenia”

“Award-winning writer and former mental-health nurse Nathan Filer redefines our understanding of the illness.” A review of The Heartland: Finding and Losing Schizophrenia by Nathan Filer.

The Amazon Book Review   “Talking with Neil Gaiman about ‘Good Omens’”

Neil Gaiman talks about adapting Good Omens, the novel he co-authored with Terry Pratchett, 30 years ago. (Pratchett died in 2015.) The 6-episode adaptation is currently available on Amazon Prime Video.

Esquire    “Central Park Five Prosecutor Linda Fairstein Has Responded to When They See Us Backlash”

Should now-successful-crime-novelist Linda Fairstein be held responsible for the later-reversed conviction of the Central Park Five?

CityLab    “Writers Are More Prolific When They Cluster”

Despite the stereotype of authors toiling away in lonely solitude, a new study finds that British and Irish writers clustered in 18th- and 19th-century London and were more productive as a result. 

© 2019 by Mary Daniels Brown

Blog a Day Challenge: March Report

Here are my statistics for March:

Number of posts written: 31

Shortest post: 220

Longest post: 2,150

Total words written: 23,345

Average post length: 753

Distribution of posts across my three blogs:

The total of posts here may not equal the number of posts written last month because I occasionally publish the same post on more than one blog. However, I have included each post only once in my total word count.

Last month’s featured post:

On Rereading “Anne of Green Gables”

This post generated a lot (well, a lot for me) of “favorites” and retweets on Twitter. At first I thought that might have happened because the use of the Classics Club hashtag targeted the post to a specific audience. But I published another review with the same hashtag within just a few days of this one, and the second one did not receive the same reaction.

So I’m guessing that the personal orientation of this post caused the increased reaction. The other Classics Club post was a straight book review, but this one emphasized my personal reaction to how reading the book now, as an older adult, affected me differently than had reading it as a child.

What I Learned in March

In February I focused on post length. In March I decided not to worry about length. Instead, I concentrated on writing however many words were necessary to cover each post’s topic. Here are the results of that change of focus:

  • My total words written increased by 2,890.
  • My average post length increased by 93.
  • My number of posts of 1,000 or more words increased from 6 to 9.

The lesson I take from these statistics is that I should worry about each individual post and let the word count fall wherever it may.

The second lesson, which I take from the relative popularity of the post about rereading Anne of Green Gables, is that I should strive to incorporate more personal storytelling into my writing. I knew that, of course, at least in theory. That is why I chose story as my word for this year. But the interest in this post reinforced the lesson for me.

I continue to read more blog posts than I did before starting this blog post a day challenge. From now on I’ll make a more conscious effort to look at which ones most engage me and to learn how and why they do.