Literary Links

Here are some of the articles about the world of literature that caught my eye recently.

The New York Review of Books  “Truth, Beauty, and Oliver Sacks”

Simon Callow reviews Everything in Its Place: First Loves and Last Tales by Oliver Sacks, the second posthumous collection of Sacks’s essays, most of which were published in The New York Review.

the editors have fashioned the book in such a way that we are left with an image of the author that is extraordinarily touching—not lacking in his habitual energy and driven curiosity, but somehow vulnerable, even fragile.

brainpickings   “The Healing Power of Gardens: Oliver Sacks on the Psychological and Physiological Consolations of Nature”

Maria Popova discuses Oliver Sacks’s book Everything in Its Place: First Loves and Last Tales.

Esquire   Anthony Bourdain Remembered Is a Stunning Tribute to the Late Chef”

A look at the book, put together by CNN, that “includes photos and messages from Barack Obama, Eric Ripert, Jill Filipovic, Ken Burns, Questlove, José Andrés and others who worked with Bourdain.”

The Guardian   “The Heartland review – fascinating study of schizophrenia”

“Award-winning writer and former mental-health nurse Nathan Filer redefines our understanding of the illness.” A review of The Heartland: Finding and Losing Schizophrenia by Nathan Filer.

The Amazon Book Review   “Talking with Neil Gaiman about ‘Good Omens’”

Neil Gaiman talks about adapting Good Omens, the novel he co-authored with Terry Pratchett, 30 years ago. (Pratchett died in 2015.) The 6-episode adaptation is currently available on Amazon Prime Video.

Esquire    “Central Park Five Prosecutor Linda Fairstein Has Responded to When They See Us Backlash”

Should now-successful-crime-novelist Linda Fairstein be held responsible for the later-reversed conviction of the Central Park Five?

CityLab    “Writers Are More Prolific When They Cluster”

Despite the stereotype of authors toiling away in lonely solitude, a new study finds that British and Irish writers clustered in 18th- and 19th-century London and were more productive as a result. 

© 2019 by Mary Daniels Brown

On Novels and Novelists

10 Best Novels by Poets

Novelist and poet Naja Marie Aidt offers a list of novels “that bring a poetic sensitivity to language into the history of the novel.” She especially asks us to take a look at the work of the Danish poets included (the first two entries on her list), whom we Americans may not know about.

Read what she has to say about the use of language by the authors of these novels:

Azorno by Inger Christensen
The Murder of Halland by Pia Juul
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Notebook by Agota Kristof
The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge by Rainer Maria Rilke
The Making of Americans by Gertrude Stein
Malina by Ingeborg Bachmann
Insel by Mina Loy
Autobiography of Red by Anne Carson
Leaving the Atocha Station by Ben Lerner

Harper Lee and Truman Capote: A Collaboration in Mischief

Cover: To Kill a MockingbirdThe recent publication of Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee, the original manuscript that eventually evolved into To Kill a Mockingbird, revived interest in the childhood friendship between Lee and Truman Capote. Soon there will be some new work by Capote as well. In October Random House will publish a collection of lost short stories by Capote that were discovered by Peter Haag, the owner of Capote’s German publisher, while he was doing research in the Capote archive at the New York Public Library.

And soon there will also be a middle-grade novel to introduce young readers to the childhoods of these friends who grew up to be two of the American South’s finest writers. Greg Neri has written Tru & Nelle, to be released next spring.

both [Nelle Harper Lee and Truman Capote] were oddballs who took refuge in detective novels, and they quickly bonded over their mutual love of Sherlock Holmes and the Rover Boys, spending long afternoons reading mysteries in their treehouse sanctuary. To entertain themselves, they started writing their own stories on her father’s Underwood typewriter, taking turns as one of them narrated while the other typed.

Maybe some budding writers will be encouraged to pursue their dreams by reading about two other children who loved reading and writing.

Rescuing Wonderful Shivery Tales

When Wilhelm and Jacob Grimm began collecting and writing down songs, stories, and folklore in the early 1800’s, they were working to preserve the authentic voices of the people. Under the influence of a Romantic movement calling for the unification of Germany, they collected these stories to save what they believed was authentic German popular culture.

In this article in The New York Review of Books, Marina Warner traces the history of Grimms’ folk and fairy tales. She notes how the tales have changed over time and what those changes suggest. Since fairy tales and folklore contain many of the archetypes found in later literature, this is a fascinating read for those interested in literary history and literary criticism.

Why Do I Love New York?

A Crime Writer’s Tour of the City That Never Sleeps

Linda Fairstein is an attorney turned novelist. She joined the Manhattan District Attorney’s office in 1972 and headed the sex crimes unit from 1976 until 2002. She continues to consult as a sex crimes expert. Fairstein is the author of a series of crime novels featuring Manhattan prosecutor Alexandra Cooper. The most recent book, Devil’s Bridge, is #17 in the series.

In this article she describes why New York City is so fascinating for a crime novelist:

Yes, I love New York — and perhaps it’s because I’m a crime novelist that I’m fascinated by its dark underbelly and rich history, which keep me riveted and searching for new discoveries at every turn.

10 Novels with Multiple Narratives

Susan Barker’s novel The Incarnations traces 1,000 years of Chinese history through the reincarnations of two main characters. She explains why she likes novels with multiple narratives:

Truth is often a multiplicity of perspectives, and sometimes the more viewpoints and versions of events there are, the closer the reader gets to an overarching truth. I like the element of mystery these books can sometimes involve, the way the cogs in the reader’s brain have to grind to figure out connections between the various narrative threads.

I like novels narrated from multiple points of view for the same reason. I studied life stories, and I’m fascinated by the way different people experience the same event differently. You’ve heard the adage “There are two sides to every story.” In fact, there are as many sides to every story as there are participants in the event.

Here are the novels with multiple narratives that Barker recommends:

2666 by Roberto Bolano
The Emigrants by W.G. Sebald
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz
Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann
Five Star Billionaire by Tash Aw
Great House by Nicole Krauss
If on a winter’s night a traveler by Italo Calvino
Ghostwritten by David Mitchell
Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout
Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov

Here are a couple of books I’d add to the list:

An Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears
A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan

“Dune,” climate fiction pioneer: The ecological lessons of Frank Herbert’s sci-fi masterpiece were ahead of its time

I know a lot of people who love Frank Herbert’s Dune, which I’ve never read. But I’m going to have to pick it up soon, since Frank Herbert is the native son of our new home town, Tacoma, WA. We now live very near where the arsenic smelter that Herbert grew up with was located. Just last year a park not far from us was completely dug up for removal of arsenic-contaminated soil. New soil was put down, and the ball fields were reseeded and closed for a year for the grass to grow in.

In this piece for Salon Michael Berry discusses the significance of Dune as it turns 50. He hopes that the novel will take its rightful place in the annals of ecological fiction “now that there is a renewed interest in literature – science fiction and otherwise – that explores the effects of a changing global climate.” Berry concludes:

as “Dune” celebrates its golden anniversary, it stands as a piece of literature with far-reaching influence, inspiring new generations of readers, writers and scientists to look at their own planet in a different light.