The idea of time travel has fascinated artists, scientists, and historians for centuries. Authors have used the possibility of traveling through time to explore some of the big questions of human existence.

Here are five examples.

Time and Again by Jack Finney

When a secret government organization recruits advertising artist Si Morley for its time travel experiment, Morley jumps at the chance. His friend has the remnant of a partially burned letter dated January 1882, and Morley intends to see what he can find out about the letter writer and intended recipient. One temptation of time travel is that travelers will like some other time period better than their own. When Morley falls in love with a woman from the world of 1882, he must decide exactly who he is and where he belongs.

This 1970 novel is one of the most popular time-travel books, and its reputation is well deserved. Finney creates a compelling picture of life in New York City at the end of the nineteenth century and even makes time travel seem like a logical possibility. If you’re new to time travel literature, this novel is a good place to start.

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

This novel uses time travel to present an unlikely love story. Clare and Henry are soul mates, but Henry suffers from a rare genetic condition that throws him into temporal free fall whenever he experiences a high-stress situation. Although Henry cannot control when he vanishes and to what time period he travels, he always lands at some point in his own life time—either his past, present, or future. And he almost always lands somewhere and somewhen near Clare.

Much of the novel focuses on how both Clare and Henry learn to live with his unusual condition. But its emotional center is their love story, which transcends all the complications of their lives.

11/22/63 by Stephen King

One of the most intriguing aspects of time travel literature is consideration of this question: What if someone could travel back in time and prevent some tragic disaster? This is the situation Jake Epping, a 35-year-old English teacher from Maine, encounters. Jake’s friend Al has discovered a portal back to 1958 in the rear of his diner. Al has been traveling back and forth, gathering information necessary to prevent the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

When Al’s failing health prevents him from finishing his mission, he recruits Jake to take up the cause. Using Al’s research, Jake settles into a life in 1958 Texas while planning to thwart Lee Harvey Oswald’s attack in Dallas. But like Si Morley in Time and Again, Jake discovers that life in another time period has potential complications. And even if Jake can stop the assassination, should he? What are the consequences of changing the past so drastically?

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

In 1976 in California, Dana, an African American woman, is suddenly pulled through time and plunked down in pre-Civil War Maryland. She saves a drowning white boy, only to find herself staring down the barrel of a shotgun. Just as her life is about to end, she is pulled through time once again and deposited back into her present life. Dana experiences several more of these time-wrenching experiences, always landing in the life of the same young man.

Octavia E. Butler was the first black woman to write science fiction, and this is her best known and most often studied novel. Butler won both Hugo and Nebula awards and in 1995 became the first science fiction writer to receive a MacArthur Foundation Genius Award. This novel uses time travel as a trope for exploring questions of cultural history and social justice.

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Billy Pilgrim has come unstuck in time.

Focusing on the World War II fire-bombing of Dresden, Kurt Vonnegut examines the meaning of history and of human existence in what has become one of the most famous anti-war literary works of all time. This novel considers war not only as a broad, abstract concept of history but also as a human experience that affects all the people it touches.

No description can possibly do this novel justice. You must read it. It’s short, but you’ll continue to think about it for the rest of your life.

© 2017 by Mary Daniels Brown

10 Memoirs That Explore the Mother-Daughter Relationship (in remembrance of Debbie Reynolds & Carrie Fisher)

Shortly after the deaths of Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds on subsequent days, Susan Dominus examined the strained relationship between this mother and daughter in the New York Times: Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher, a Mother-Daughter Act for the Ages. Dominus writes:

There is something about celebrity mother-daughter acts like the one lived by Ms. Fisher and Ms. Reynolds that capture the imagination in a way that famous father-sons simply do not.

I’d say we can leave out the words celebrity and famous. Even the most ordinary mother-daughter relationship is archetypal, fraught with push-pull, attract-repel, love-hate, bond-reject, up-down, engage-disengage, support-undermine dynamics.

The HBO documentary Bright Lights, first aired on January 7, 2017, further reveals the intertwining lives of Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds.

And here are 10 memoirs that focus on the relationship between mothers and their daughters:

Fierce Attachments by Vivian Gornick

Returning to My Mother’s House by Gail Straub

Don’t Call Me Mother by Linda Joy Myers

The Liars’ Club by Mary Karr

Then Again by Diane Keaton

Blue Nights by Joan Didion

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? by Jeanette Winterson

Traveling with Pomegranates: A Mother-Daughter Story by Sue Monk Kidd and Ann Kidd Taylor

Mother Daughter Me: A Memoir by Katie Hafner

We’ll Always Have Paris: A Mother/Daughter Memoir by Jennifer Coburn

 

© 2017 by Mary Daniels Brown

Of the 42 books I read in 2016, these are the top 15 (listed alphabetically by author):

Cook, Thomas H. The Chatham School Affair
du Maurier, Daphne. Rebecca
French, Tana. Broken Harbor
Haruf, Kent. Our Souls at Night
Hawley, Noah. Before the Fall
Knowles, John. A Separate Peace
Plath, Sylvia The Bell Jar
Stedman, M.L. The Light Between Oceans
Strout, Elizabeth. My Name is Lucy Barton
Yanagihara, Hanya. A Little Life

Honorable Mention

Connelly, Michael. The Wrong Side of Goodbye
Galbraith, Robert. Career of Evil
King, Stephen. 11/22/63
Sweeney, Cynthia D’Aprix. The Nest
Updike, John. Of the Farm

How About You?

What were the best books you read in 2016?

 

© 2017 by Mary Daniels Brown

Best Books of 2016: Final Installment

LITERARY HUB’S BEST BOOKS OF 2016

The staff of Literary Hub offer their choices of the year’s best books in a list vastly different from typical best-seller lists.

The Top 10 Library Stories of 2016

OK, this isn’t a best books list, but it IS a book-related summary of the year’s events.

Great Reads

An interactive guide to The Seattle Times’ best books recommendations from the past few years.

10 OVERLOOKED BOOKS BY WOMEN IN 2016

This piece starts out with the reasons why a list of outstanding books written by women is necessary.

The Year in Reading

From The New York Times:

In this season of giving, we asked some notably avid readers — who also happen to be poets, musicians, diplomats, filmmakers, novelists, actors and artists — to share the books that accompanied them through 2016.

THE 60 BEST BOOK COVERS OF 2016, AS CHOSEN BY DESIGNERS

this year, we had a healthy quantity of beautiful, inventive, arresting, unforgettable book cover designs, many of which deserve recognition.

BEST OF 2016

I’ve included a couple of these in earlier installments, but here’s the complete list of the year’s best books in the following categories:

  • poetry
  • comics
  • economics
  • philosophy
  • nonfiction
The 10 Best Movie Adaptations of 2016

Critic Lisa Rosman lists her favorite book-to-film adaptations of the year.

The 11 Best Poetry Books Of 2016

From BuzzFeed

13 of Off the Shelf’s Favorite Book Recommendations from 2016

Off the Shelf is made possible by a small group of passionate readers who love nothing more than discovering fantastic books and sharing them with Off the Shelf readers. We recommend books that move us to laughter and tears—and everything in between. It gives us great pleasure to offer you a collection of our favorite single-title recommendations from 2016.

The folks at Off the Shelf offer lists of recommended books on particular topics throughout the year. They have recommended all of these books during 2016, but not all of these books were published this year.

BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD

An earlier list of best books lists included the top five books of the year as voted by Book of the Month members. Here, BOTM announces the overall winner.

THE YEAR’S BEST OVERLOOKED BOOKS, ACCORDING TO BOOKSELLERS

A bit of a different twist on a best books list.

A Year in Reading: 2016

From The Millions comes a round-up of the year’s reading from a great host of writers, including Tana French, Richard Russo, Annie Proulx, and Megan Abbott.

The 30 Best Books of 2016

Compiled by Daniel Ford on Writer’s Bone.

The best books of 2016 list you get when you combine 36 “Best Books of 2016” lists

Yes, you read that right:

By combining 36 different qualitative “best books” lists by everyone from the New York Times to The Telegraph to a smattering of celebrities (full list of lists here), Quartz has created the Ultimate Authoritative Unimpeachable Top 20 Books of 2016.

Get A Global Perspective With 5 Of The Year’s Best Books In Translation

I don’t know about you, but I don’t read enough literature translated from other languages. Why is this important?

There’s a great quote by Haruki Murakami: “If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.” This, of course, is two-fold, because it also means that if you want to think more broadly and gain a larger understanding of the world, you will seek out lesser known books, and from different places.

THE BIGGEST LITERARY STORIES OF THE YEAR: THE FINAL 5

The folks at Lit Hub present the top five literary news stories of 2016. If you jump into the link clicking maze, you can see the other 25 news stories of the year, too.

Top Crime Books of 2016

This is the lead-in page to individual lists of the year’s five best books by various folks at Crime Fiction Lover.

 

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown

Last Week’s Links

15 Incredible Movies That Started As Books

How many of these have you heard of or seen? I’ve heard of nine but have only seen five.

On the Merits of Annotating

There’s no doubt than annotating books makes us active readers. Here’s how Anthony DeFeo writes his notes in the margin:

As I read, I keep a pen in hand. Whenever something comes along that intrigues me — if a reaction pops into my head, or I have a prediction, or I want to make a note of something useful for future reference as a writer — I jot it down between the margins.

Divided times: how literature teaches us to understand ’the other’

Fiction teaches us to think creatively about difference. Anthropological studies, psychoanalysis, sociology – all offer theoretical descriptions for what a novel teaches by example and by identification. “The imitation of an action”, is what Aristotle called tragedy. It would be difficult for one to think up a more groundbreaking mode of understanding the mind and the heart. Guilt, jealousy, despair, violence, anxiety, irrationality, the fear of death – nothing that is human is foreign to literature.

It’s not your grandma’s Book of the Month Club

I rejoined Book of the Month last summer when I discovered how much it has changed since I last joined back in the early 1970s.

10 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT HOW THE NY TIMES BOOK REVIEW WORKS

Since I rely a lot on the New York Times Book Review, this article caught my eye. Here are the two tidbits I found most informative:

  1. “The Book Review at The Times reviews about 1% of the books that come out in any given year.”
  2. The best book reviews are emotional.

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown

Yet Another Installment: Best Books of 2016 Lists

13 Most Shelved Books on Off the Shelf in 2016

Off the Shelf is a site that offers lists of recommended books on all kinds of different topics. It also allows readers to register so that they can place recommended books on their personal shelves. This list reveals which books were shelved the most during 2016 (though not all were originally published this year).

BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD

These are the five finalists in Book of the Month’s readers’ poll for the Book of the Year Award.

Longreads Best of 2016: Under-Recognized Books

A hefty list of books that critics wish had gotten more love in 2016.

Off the Shelf’s 15 Favorite Book Lists from 2016

A list of lists from Off the Shelf.

Best poetry collections of 2016

Fiction takes up most of my reading time. If you, like me, could use some exposure to poetry, here are some suggestions.

Added bonus: At the bottom of this article you’ll find links to all the other Washington Post best books of 2016 lists.

16 Overall Favorite Books of 2016

From Maria Popova.

 

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown

Even More Best Books of 2016 Lists

Adam Woog’s 10 best mysteries of 2016

Seattle Times book reviewer Adam Woog lists his favorites in one of my favorite literary genres.

PW’s Top Authors Pick Their Favorite Books of 2016

A short list compiled by Publishers Weekly.

2016 By the Books: A Month-by-Month Reader’s Guide

This list takes a bit of an unusual approach to analyzing the books of 2016:

For help understanding what the heck happened in 2016, and how Trump stands to inherit it all, check out these 12 books paired with each month’s major news.

10 Overlooked Books of 2016: From The Red Car to Future Sex

It was a profound year for the written word and yet many incredible books remain unsung. Here are ten books from 2016 that deserve your time and attention.

The Best Children’s Books of 2016

Maria Popova chooses her favorite picture books of the year.

These are the top 100 books of the year, according to Google

The year’s top “books and graphic novels … ranked based on their popularity in the Google Play store.” This method of evaluation means that not all the books listed here were published in 2016.

Customer Favorites: 2016’s Top-Selling New Releases

From Amazon: “List counts only first editions published in 2016 and includes paid units in print and Kindle.”

The mother list is broken down into several categories:

  • Top 20 Overall Customer Favorites for 2016
  • Top 20 Customer Favorites in Kids & Young Adult
  • Top 20 Most Wished For Books of 2016
  • Top 20 Most Gifted Books of 2016

 

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown

Some More Best Books of 2016 Lists

NPR’s Book Concierge: Our Guide To 2016’s Great Reads

NPR has put together a list of 309 books that staff and critics liked this year. On this page you can see the covers of all the choices. Or you can use the filters on the left side of the page to isolate particular kinds of books you’re interested in.

The Greatest Science Books of 2016

If you’re not yet acquainted with Maria Popova and brainpickings, let this be your introduction. Here she lists the year’s best science books, but she will probably offer lists in other fields in the near future as well.

Best Books of 2016

I’m always particularly interested in the Goodreads awards because they are chosen by ordinary readers, not critics or professional reviewers. Lots of types of books are features:

  • fiction
  • mystery & thriller
  • historical fiction
  • fantasy
  • romance
  • science fiction
  • horror
  • humor
  • nonfiction
  • memoir & autobiography
  • history & biography
  • science & technology
  • food & cookbooks
  • graphic novels & comics
  • poetry
  • debut Goodreads author
  • young adult fiction
  • young adult fantasy
  • middle grade & children’s
  • picture books
Bill Gates names his five favorite books of 2016

Just in case you’re interested in the reading habits of one of the world’s richest men …

The 24 Best Fiction Books Of 2016

The list includes novels and short story collections.

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown

More Best Books of 2016 Lists

The King County Library System’s five top books of 2016

The King County Library System, one of the largest public library systems in America with a lot of avid readers among its patrons, has released its list of the five most popular books of 2016. The library measures popularity by the number of holds placed on a title.

King County Best Books: Librarians’ Choices

The top four entries in this listing are for the current year:

  • Best Books 2016 — Teen
  • Best Books 2016 — Kids
  • Best Books 2016 — Nonfiction
  • Best Books 2016 — Fiction

And, in case you missed the entries for previous years, there are links for those here as well.

The best books of 2016, from our critics

A list from book reviewers for The Seattle Times, divided into fiction and nonfiction sections.

The 10 Best Books of 2016

The editors of The New York Times Book Review offer their choices as the year’s 10 best books, five fiction and five nonfiction.

Notable Children’s Books of 2016

The best in picture books, middle grade and young adult fiction and nonfiction, selected by the children’s books editor of The New York Times Book Review.

 

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown

Books You Can Read in One Day

The countdown to year’s end has begun. If you’re behind on your reading challenge for 2016 or just want to pad your statistics, here are some books you can easily read in a day or less.

Fiction

My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout

Dubliners by James Joyce

Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote

The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

Of the Farm by John Updike

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton

No! I Don’t Want to Join a Book Club by Virginia Ironside

A Matter of Class by Mary Balogh

The Pearl by John Steinbeck

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson

Where Are the Children? by Mary Higgins Clark

Legends of the Fall by Jim Harrison

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving

All the Old Knives by Olen Steinhauer

Child of God by Cormac McCarthy

Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

Nowhere to Be Found by Bae Suah, translated by Sora Kim-Russell

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne

Our Souls at Night by Kent Haruf

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

Train Dreams by Denis Johnson

The Hour of the Star by Clarice Lispector

Sleepless Nights by Elizabeth Hardwick

The Plains by Gerald Murnane

The Beauty of the Husband by Anne Carson

Miss Lonelyhearts by Nathanael West

The Missing Year of Juan Salvatierra by Pedro Mairal

Not to Disturb by Muriel Spark

Nonfiction

Slow Reading by John Miedema

A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf

The Ancient Art of Tea by Warren Peltier

Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss

Days on the Road: Crossing the Plains in 1865 by Sarah Raymond Herndon

The Tao of Psychology by Jean Shinoda Bolen

Synchronicity: An Acausal Connecting Principle by C.G. Jung, trans. R.F.C. Hull

Writing in an Age of Silence by Sara Paretsky

Comfort: A Journey Through Grief by Ann Hood

Gift from the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh

The Faith of a Writer: Life, Craft, Art by Joyce Carol Oates

Wordsmithy: Hot Tips for the Writing Life by Douglas Wilson

In Addition

19 Wonderful Short Books and Stories to Read Now

 

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown