Seattle bookstores were doomed. Then Third Place helped rewrite the story. | The Seattle Times

Ten years ago, the arrival of the recession combined with Amazon’s deep discounts seemed to herald the end for independent bookstores. But in the past few years they’ve made an improbable comeback. At Third Place Books, which opened its first store 20 years ago, the key to success is community.

Source: Seattle bookstores were doomed. Then Third Place helped rewrite the story. | The Seattle Times

Some good news in the world of bookstores, from Seattle, the home of Amazon.

Books You Can Read in One Day or Less

How are you doing on your reading challenges or goals now that the end of 2018 is quickly approaching? If you still have spots to tick off on your challenge or need to pad your statistics, here are some books that can be read in one day or less.

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer by Fredrik Backman

The Uncommon Reader by Alan Bennett

A Christmas Memory by Truman Capote

Treasure Island!!! by Sara Levine

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress by Dai Sijie

Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin

Near to the Wild Heart by Clarice Lispector

The Vegetarian by Han Kang

Survival Lessons by Alice Hoffman

Visitation by Jenny Erpenbeck

A Separation by Katie Kitamura

Black Olives by Martha Tod Dudman

A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes

Desperate Characters by Paula Fox

Prozac Diary by Lauren Slater

The Grownup by Gillian Flynn

The Pigman by Paul Zindel

Elect Mr. Robinson for a Better World by Donald Antrim

Autobiography of Red by Anne Carson

Glaciers by Alexis Smith

Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer

So Long, See You Tomorrow by William Maxwell

Black Water by Joyce Carol Oates

Tinkers by Paul Harding

Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill

The Trial by Franz Kafka

Frank by Jon Ronson

Mrs. Caliban by Rachel Ingalls

Anatomy of an Illness by Norman Cousins

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares

The Passion by Jeanette Winterson

I Don’t Know by Leah Hager Cohen

We the Animals by Justin Torres

Tortilla Flat by John Steinbeck

Grief Is the Thing with Feathers by Max Porter

One Writer’s Beginnings by Eudora Welty

Lying by Lauren Slater

Illness as Metaphor and AIDS and Its Metaphors by Susan Sontag

The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder

In the Garden of the North American Martyrs by Tobias Wolff

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Seven Years (Bibliomysteries Book 6) by Peter Robinson (and other entries in the Bibliomysteries series)

Idaho Winter by Tony Burgess

On the Island at the Center of the Center of the World by Elizabeth Kadetsky

Elevation by Stephen King

The Country of the Pointed Firs by Sarah Orne Jewett

Rules for Aging: A Wry and Witty Guide to Life by Roger Rosenblatt

And here are some other lists of books you can read in a day or less:

17 Brilliant Short Novels You Can Read in a Sitting
18 (More) Amazing Novels You Can Read in a Day
Concise But Powerful: 12 Novellas and Short Novels to Read Now

5 Books You Can Read in One Sitting

9 Classic Novellas By Women You Can Read in a Day

8 Great Crime Novels You Can Read in a Day

10 Books That Are Small But Mighty

The books on this list range from 96 to 208 pages.

50 SHORT NONFICTION BOOKS YOU CAN READ IN A DAY (OR TWO)

The books listed here are divided into categories:

  • books under 100 pages
  • books under 200 pages
  • books under 300 pages

And each book description specifies its number of pages, so you’ll have no trouble finding titles to fit your available time.

HOW TO MEET YOUR READING GOALS BY YEAR’S END

Some general strategies as well as specific book suggestions for meeting your reading goals.

© 2018 by Mary Daniels Brown

Harry Potter themed fan event conjures up wizardy in Tacoma | The News Tribune

The non-profit event had attracted 2,300 participants as of Saturday, Wehnert said. It will wrap up Sunday.

“Last night we had our Great Feast,” Wehnert said. “People were anticipating just having a fancy meal. When it turned out to also be a concert with Voldemort doing belly dancing with an 8-foot-long python, they realized they were getting much more for their money.”

Source: Harry Potter themed fan event conjures up wizardy in Tacoma | The News Tribune

Holiday Shopping: #GiveaBook, Help a Child

’Tis the season for buying, giving, and donating books. Penguin Random House is embracing that spirit of generosity with the launch of #GiveaBook, a social media campaign that promotes books as holiday gifts, and also serves as an avenue to donate books to U.S. children in need via the aid organization Save the Children. Each time the hashtag #GiveaBook is used on Facebook and Twitter before December 25, Penguin Random House will donate a book to Save the Children, up to 25,000 times.

Source: Holiday Shopping: #GiveaBook, Help a Child

April Is National Poetry Month

National Poetry Month, held every April, is the largest literary celebration in the world with schools, publishers, libraries, booksellers, and poets celebrating poetry’s vital place in our culture.

Inspired by the success of Black History Month (February) and Women’s History Month (March), the Academy of American Poets founded National Poetry Month in April 1996. This celebration aims to:

  • highlight the extraordinary legacy and ongoing achievement of American poets,
  • encourage the reading of poems,
  • assist teachers in bringing poetry into their classrooms,
  • increase the attention paid to poetry by national and local media,
  • encourage increased publication and distribution of poetry books, and
  • encourage support for poets and poetry.

kid with booksNational Poetry Month features several projects aimed at getting students interested in reading, thinking about, and writing poetry. One such project is Dear Poet, a multimedia education project for grades five through 12 that asks students to write letters in response to hearing poems read by award-winning poets. Both students and teachers can find information on how to participate here.

The National Poetry Month website also offers links to lesson plans for teachers as well as lists of poems organized by occasion and of poetry events (“poetry near you”). You can also sign up for the following newsletters:

  • Poem-a-Day Newsletter
  • Academy of American Poets Newsletter
  • Academy of American Poets Educator Newsletter

Here are 30 ways to celebrate national poetry month (click on this link to see the list presented with links to resource materials):

  1. Order a free National Poetry Month poster and display it at work or school.
  2. Sign up for Poem-a-Day and read a poem each morning.
  3. Deepen your daily experience by reading Edward Hirsch’s essay “How to Read a Poem.”
  4. Memorize a poem.
  5. Create an anthology of your favorite poems on Poets.org.
  6. Encourage a young person to participate in the Dear Poet project.
  7. Buy a book of poetry from your local bookstore.
  8. Review these concrete examples of how poetry matters in the United States today.
  9. Learn more about poets and poetry events in your state.
  10. Ask your governor or mayor for a proclamation in support of National Poetry Month.
  11. Attend a poetry reading at a local university, bookstore, cafe, or library.
  12. Read a poem at an open mic. It’s a great way to meet other writers in your area and find out about your local poetry writing community.
  13. Start a poetry reading group.
  14. Write an exquisite corpse poem with friends.
  15. Chalk a poem on the sidewalk.
  16. Write a letter to a poet thanking them for their work.
  17. Ask the United States Post Office to issue more stamps celebrating poets.
  18. Recreate a poet’s favorite food or drink by following his or her recipe.
  19. Read about different poetic forms.
  20. Read about poems titled “poem.”
  21. Read the first chapter of Muriel Rukeyer’s inspiring book, The Life of Poetry.
  22. Subscribe to American Poets magazine or a small press poetry journal.
  23. Watch Rachel Eliza Griffiths’ latest Poets on Poetry video.
  24. Watch or read Carolyn Forche’s talk “Not Persuasion, But Transport: The Poetry of Witness.”
  25. Read or listen to Mark Doty’s talk “Tide of Voices: Why Poetry Matters Now.”
  26. Read Allen Ginsberg’s classic essay about Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass.”
  27. Watch a poetry movie.
  28. Sign up for a poetry class or workshop.
  29. Get ready for Mother’s Day by making a card featuring a line of poetry.
  30. Celebrate National Poem in Your Pocket Day on April 30, 2015. The idea is simple: select a poem you love, carry it with you, then share it with coworkers, family, and friends.

The following organizations helped make National Poetry Month 2015 possible: 826 National, American Booksellers Association, American Library Association, Graywolf Press, National Council of Teachers of English, National Endowment for the Arts, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Papyrus, Random House, and Scholastic.