stream of consciousness


stream of consciousness

“A narrative technique developed toward the end of the 19th century, employed to evoke the psychic life of a character and depict subjective as well as objective reality…As a literary term, “stream of consciousness” generally refers to the presentation of a character’s thoughts, feelings, reactions, etc., on an approximated preverbal level and with little or no direct comment or explanation by the author…In general, the term “stream of consciousness” is used as the description of mental life at the borderline of conscious thought and is characterized by the devices of association, reiteration of word- or symbol-motifs, apparent incoherence, and the reduction or elimination of normal syntax and punctuation to simulate the free flow of the character’s mental processes…aspects of stream-of-consciousness techniques are evident in the work of most of the important writers to appear since the 1930s” (Source: Benet’s, p 988-989).

Example: The Butcher Boy by Patrick McCabe.


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