irony


irony

“In rhetoric, a deliberate dissembling for effect or to intensify meaning. In the most general sense, two categories of irony can be identified: verbal irony, in which it is plain that the speaker means the opposite of what he says, and circumstantial, or situational, irony, in which there is a discrepancy between what might reasonably be expected and what actually occurs—between the appearance of a situation and its reality. One of the most common forms of verbal irony is the use of praise when a slur is intended…Tragic irony results from a perception of the intensity of human striving and the indifference of the universe…In dramatic irony, a speaker may utter words that have a hidden meaning intelligible to the audience but of which he himself is unaware…” (Source: Benet’s,  510).


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